The Swiftype Blog / Month: August 2015

White paper: Designing Ecommerce for the Mobile Shopper

This week we are excited to announce a new white paper from Swiftype: Designing Ecommerce for the Mobile Shopper. Here at Swiftype we’ve been fascinated by the steady growth of mobile across every corner of the web, and wanted to summarize our research and findings in a report that looks closely at the influence of mobile in the ecommerce space.

Learn how ecommerce design should take cues from the unique expectations of mobile shoppers.

As a starting point, the report aims to uncover the differences in behavior that distinguish mobile shoppers from those on desktop, looking at the relationship between online sales and online traffic across different types of devices. Questions addressed include:

  • How has mobile ecommerce grown in the past few years and how will this trend develop moving forward?
  • How do the aims of mobile shoppers differ from shoppers on desktop?
  • What strategies have industry leaders adopted to optimize their mobile ecommerce experience?

This report also looks at the differences between ecommerce trends within apps and on mobile browsers, helping site owners determine where they should focus their development efforts as they look to optimize their business for the increasingly prominent mobile shopper. To access your copy of the report, follow the link below.

What Are Swiftype Web Components?

I do a lot of Swiftype integrations with enterprise customers. Search applications are like christmas trees – everyone knows what they look like, but have very specific ideas about how to customize them. For developers, having the right resources to meet this expectation, in the desired project timeline, is a must. That is why we’ve launched Swiftype Web Components, a resource rich website built to support developers who are responsible for integrating search for their company or client.

Web Components is an emerging standard for developing more complex HTML elements. Swiftype Web Components is based on the React javascript library, but it’s not dependent on React. So, we’ve actually built a library that supports React, but can also support other web component libraries; such as Riot, Polymer or webcomponents.js, which follow Web Component design patterns. For those unfamiliar with React, it is a very popular JavaScript library that came out of Facebook.

The idea of web components is that you can take a complicated application, like a search results page, and break it up into a bunch of different components that all operate independently. In our catalog, which is the first place to start, we have about 30 to 40 components that all can sit on the page together and work to provide a powerful search interface. Each component is optional and can be composed easily to fit the desired experience. For example, some customers might not want faceting so they don’t have to include that component. Other things like pagination, most people are going to want and they’re going to put on every search results application.

The component catalog is broken up into categories for organization. Some categories are sorting, faceting, filtering, links, how to handle misspelling, pagination etc.. All these items are components, that put together, deliver a really powerful search application. Our goal is to standardize these components to make everybody’s search results powerful, easy to use, and based on the same flexible core library.

A developer who’s learning about how to use components can begin by clicking the Get Started Now button, which leads you to our install tutorial. We’ve built a starter kit, which brings you to a small search application that we’ve built. The nice thing about what we’ve built is that you can actually edit the search application and start working with the code from your browser without having to set up a development environment or anything. When you’re happy with your changes you can share the link with others and download the customized files.

Our site also includes technical documentation for the library and examples that demo how components can be composed to build different search applications.

We’ve love to get your feedback. So please reach out to us and let us know what other resources you need to be able available to build search very quickly and easily.

Analytics is changing how editors and publishers build experiences for their audience online. Check out this webinar to learn why.

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Creating an engaging user experience is paramount to the success of digital publishing. A primary component of any engagement strategy is helping your users find content that is timely, interesting, and relevant to their interests. But how can you do that? Your first consideration should be your data and analytics.

Join Ben Lack, Senior Director of Marketing and Business Development for Swiftype, and Clare Carr, Director of Marketing for Parse.ly, as they cover the best questions to ask of your data and analytics to find out what your readers want and how to get it to them. See how top media brands and digital publishers are using the answers they find about their audience to power their editorial and product strategies.

  • What metrics really mean and what they’re telling you about your audience
  • 5 Questions about what your readers want that anyone on your team should be able to answer
  • Examples of how premium publishers are using analytics to grow their loyal audiences
  • Insights from Swiftype’s billions of search queries and Parse.ly‘s billions of network page views about what audiences want from all publishing sites.

So sign up today, then tune in on August 19 for a deep dive on how your editorial and publishing teams can improve your users online experience. Invite your colleagues to join, too!