The Swiftype Blog / ObjectIdColumns: Transparently Store MongoDB BSON IDs in a RDBMS

ObjectIdColumns: Transparently Store MongoDB BSON IDs in a RDBMS

Here at Swiftype, we use both MongoDB and MySQL to store some of our core metadata — not search indexes themselves, but users, accounts, search engines, and so on. As we’ve migrated data from MongoDB to MySQL, we’ve found ourselves needing to store the primary keys of MongoDB documents in MySQL.

While it’s possible to use more-or-less arbitrary data in MongoDB as your _id, very, very frequently you will simply use MongoDB’s built-in ObjectId type. This is a data type similar in concept to a UUID; it can be generated on any machine at any time, and the chance it will be globally-unique is still extremely high. Some relational databases offer native support for UUIDs; we thought, why shouldn’t we teach Rails how to get as close to that ideal as possible with ObjectIds, too?

The result has been our objectid_columns RubyGem, which we are proud to release as open source under the MIT license. Using ObjectIdColumns, you can store MongoDB ObjectId values as a CHAR(24) or VARCHAR(24) (which stores the hexadecimal representation of the ObjectId in your database), or as a BINARY(12), which stores an efficient-as-possible binary representation of the ObjectId value in your database.

No matter how you choose to store this data, it’s automatically exposed from your ActiveRecord models as an instance of the bson gem’s BSON::ObjectId class, or the moped gem’s Moped::BSON::ObjectId class. (ObjectIdColumns is compatible with both equally; the two are extremely similar.)

my_model = MyModel.find(...)
my_model.my_oid # => BSON::ObjectId('52eab2cf78161f1314000001')

You can assign values as an instance of either of these classes, or as a String representation of an ObjectId — in either hex or pure-binary forms — and it will automatically translate for you:

my_model.my_oid = BSON::ObjectId.new # OK
my_model.my_oid = "52eab32878161f1314000002" # OK
my_model.my_oid = "R\xEA\xB2\xCFx\x16\x1F\x13\x14\x00\x00\x01" # OK

ObjectIdColumns even transparently supports queries; the following will all “just work”:

MyModel.where(:my_oid => BSON::ObjectId('52eab2cf78161f1314000001'))
MyModel.where(:my_oid => '52eab2cf78161f1314000001')
MyModel.where(:my_oid => 'R\xEA\xB2\xCFx\x16\x1F\x13\x14\x00\x00\x01'))

Enjoy! Head on over to the objectid_columns GitHub page for more details, or just drop gem ‘objectid_columns’in your Gemfile and go for it!

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